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New Moneyworts Make a Colorful Ground Cover for Shade

‘Firefly’ and ‘Night Light’ are two distinct perennial moneyworts, or lysimachia, that brighten shady spots with their golden flowers, which occur continually from spring until fall’s hard frost. These plants have similar bee-friendly flowers and growing requirements, but they differ in their foliage and habit. They can be planted together to make a dynamic ground cover for shade.

'Night Light' moneywort has golden flowers and silvery green-veined purple leaves.

'Night Light' moneywort has golden flowers and silvery green-veined purple leaves.

Common name: 'Firefly' moneywort and 'Night Light' moneywort

Botanical name: Lysimachia congestiflora ‘Firefly’, Lysimachia alfredii ‘Night Light’

Exposure: Part sun to full shade

Flowers: These moneyworts bloom from spring until the first hard frost in autumn. Their five-petaled flowers are golden yellow and they attract pollinators.

'Firefly's foliage starts out purple and ages to solid green.

'Firefly's foliage starts out purple and ages to solid green.

Foliage: 'Night Light' moneywort has dark green leaves that bear a purple cast and silvery green veining. The stems and the undersides of the leaves are maroon. Meanwhile the foliage of 'Firefly' is solid burgundy when young, fading to green as it matures. Both colors can be present on the plant at once, making for interesting contrast. 

Habit: 'Nightlight' is a mounding plant that reaches 12 inches tall and 14 inches wide. 'Firefly' grows to the same width but it is more mat-like, with a lower height of 8 inches.

Origin: Both species are native to China. These cultivars were introduced by Darwin Perennials in 2022.

How to grow it: ‘Night Light’ and ‘Firefly’ moneyworts both grow in part sun to full shade. They need regular moisture and fertile soil. Stems should be trimmed to six inches in late fall. USDA Zones 5–9.

Images courtesy of Darwin Perennials