a woman's work is never done - Horticulture

a woman's work is never done

During this dark season of the year as we move toward the winter solstice, my "gardening" is more about planning than doing, but it saves my soul all the same.
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The wicked cold temps remain (it was 9 degrees F when I left the house this morning!) and snow covers all my flower beds and gardens. Yet I love this time of year, although slightly warmer temperatures would be welcome. I love this time because I do a lot of dream gardening—thinking of what to plant next year, pondering design changes, planning visits to far-flung gardens. It's still a gardening season to me despite the fact that I won't be out in the dirt digging, sweating and swearing. (Yes, I swear quite a bit at times.)

But I digress. My real point is that for those of us who call ourselves gardeners, our work is never done...thank goodness. During this dark season of the year as we move toward the winter solstice, my "gardening" is more about planning than doing, but it saves my soul all the same. Lately I've found myself pondering how I can grow edibles come spring. I don't have access to land that is mine (I'm a condo dweller and already risk repercussions with my guerrilla gardening in the "common" areas.) So I've been dreaming of a raised bed, perhaps on wheels, that I can plant at my sister's house and that I can roll out of her way. She won't want a garden in her front yard, but perhaps she wouldn't mind a temporary plot that can be moved in and out of the sun?

To help me with my planning I'm using one of the Womanswork Gardening Wheels (the herb version). I definitely want to grow herbs in my edible garden, and these ingenious wheels make planning simple. You'll discover what combos work well together and how to place the plants so everyone gets the light they need. (The wheels make a great gift for friends...hint, hint.)

The seed catalogs have begun arriving here and while I love them all, I'm particularly fond of the artwork on the Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds book. The illustration on the front of the tomato held in the hand of a gardener (complete with jagged, dirty nails) is charming! Here's a link to order a copy of your own if you don't already receive it. I'm off to thumb through today's mail arrivals, to pull the blanket tighter around my lap, and to do a little garden work.

Wishing you peace on the garden path,

Patty