Moving Plants

I’m thinking of rearranging some plants in my garden this spring. Do you have any advice for moving plants from one place to another?

Answer: Early spring is a good time to move most perennials, save for those that bloom in spring. Wait until just after those have bloomed.

Do this task on a cloudy day or late in the afternoon. Water the plants thoroughly a few hours before you plan to move them (if the soil is dry). Prepare the new site first by digging the planting hole. Dig the plant up carefully, aiming to get the entire root ball and keep it in tact. Plant it in the new hole as you would a new plant. Water thoroughly again. Keep an eye on the plant as it gets established, watering it regularly.
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3 thoughts on “Moving Plants

  1. Would this also apply to moving/dividing rhubarb plants? I believe fall is the best time to divide them but I was not able to move them at that time and wondered if I could still move them to another spot in the garden in early spring.

    • Yes! You can transplant and divide rhubarb in early spring — actually it is just as good a time as fall. Make sure to dig deep to get a good portion of the root system. If you are also dividing them, use a sharp knife to split the roots into sections and make sure each section has a couple buds from which the topgrowth will come. Don’t let the roots dry out — try to get them into their new place and watered right away. Plant them so that the buds are a couple inches below ground. If for some reason you can’t get them right into the ground, you can put them in a plastic bag with some damp paper towels and store them in a cool, dark place for a few days.

      • Meghan, about that last part of your post (“If for some reason you can’t get them right into the ground, you can put them in a plastic bag with some damp paper towels and store them in a cool, dark place for a few days”)–does the same go for ANY plant?? (or ALMOST any plant?) Meaning, can perennials and such be stored this way if you’re not able to plant them right away? What about small shrubs and/or trees? (or even somewhat larger ones?) And, are there any specific plants for which this should NOT be done?? Thanks!!

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