Drumstick Allium: Round Purple Flowers Grown from a Bulb

drumstick alliumVirtues: This late-blooming allium, or ornamental onion, has round purple flowers that appear in early to midsummer, later than most other alliums. The long-lasting flowers are great in the garden or for bouquets. Drumstick alliums are deer-resistant plants. The flowers attract pollinators.

Common name: Drumstick allium, round-headed garlic. round-headed leek

Botanical name: Allium sphaerocephalon

Flowers: 1-inch oval-shaped purple flowers appear in early to midsummer on stiff, thin stems 18 to 36 inches tall. These allium flowers first appear green but turn pink then purple as they open and mature. Good flowers for fresh or dried bouquets.

Foliage: Gray-green, grassy leaves to 14 inches long appear as a clump in spring.

Season: Summer.

Origin: Europe, northern Africa and western Asia

Cultivation: Drumstick alliums look best grown in clumps or drifts of 12 or more. The bulbs can also be scattered among perennials so that their purple flowers poke up amid the other plants. Grow in full sun or part shade. Full sun is better. Alliums prefer well-drained, fertile soil. Drumstick alliums grow from fall-planted bulbs. Plant the bulbs 3 to 5 inches deep. These bulbs naturalize (spread) easily by seed. If you don’t want drumstick allium to spread, deadhead them before they set seed. Allow the foliage to die back naturally. USDA Zones 4–8.

Image: H. Zell
_________________________________________________________________________________________
Mix and match plants in your garden using our fun and informative Trio of Garden Wheels: Bulb, Herb and Perennials.

Enjoy bulbs like drumstick alliums indoors. The Unexpected Houseplant includes info on forcing bulbs in indoor containers, plus many other ideas for unusual houseplants.

Planting lots of bulbs? Make the job easy with Clarington Forge’s Bulb Planter tool.

Deepen your gardening knowledge with courses from Garden How-To University, Horticulture‘s online learning program. You set the pace and schedule!

Subscribe to our free gardening e-newsletters.

Related Posts:

Leave a Reply