Bloomerang Lilac

Bloomerang lilacVirtues: This lilac is exciting for a few reasons. First and foremost, it reblooms! It offers the usual late spring lilac bloom; then it blooms strongly again in midsummer, sometimes blooming right up until the first frost. It’s also a great lilac because of its size. At about 4-by-4, this is a lilac for small gardens, tight spaces and mixed borders. Several can make a nice low deciduous hedge. Perfect near a patio, by the front door or under a window, where you can enjoy the fragrance of its flowers—without it growing too large for the space. Finally, its leaves are mildew resistant. Generally not browsed by deer.

Common name: Bloomerang lilac

Botanical name: Syringa Bloomerang (‘Penda’)

Flowers: Dark purple buds open to medium purple blooms. Flowers appear in late spring and after a rest the shrub blooms agin in midsummer. Can continue blooming until frost. Classic lilac fragrance.

Habit: Deciduous shrub 4 to 5 feet tall and 4 feet wide.

Season: Spring for first bloom. Midsummer to frost for second bloom.

Origin: Bred by Tim Wood for Proven Winners ColorChoice Plants.

Cultivation: Grow in full sun or part shade. Full sun produces best flowering. Needs moderate moisture and well-drained soil. Will not tolerate wet or heavy soil. Feed in early spring with a slow-release tree/shrub fertilizer. Prune immediately after its spring flowering, removing spent blossoms and pruning for size/shape if desired; the deadheading will encourage a better rebloom, and by pruning now you will avoid removing the flower buds that will develop in midsummer. Hot summers may delay rebloom, but it should occur once temps cool down some toward the fall. USDA Zones 3–7. Generally deer resistant.

Image courtesy of Proven Winners

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One thought on “Bloomerang Lilac

  1. USDA Plant Hardiness Zone 3-7. I would be careful about the fertilizer and the complete deadheading will encourage more growth that will not harden off which will be very sensitive to cold snaps and drying winds of Winter. That means lots of dieback. Sounds like the lilac I would try.

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