Living IN THE GARDEN 7

PHOTOGRAPHY BY WEBB CHAPPELL

HOME BASIC

Simple birdhouses in fresh, bright finishes suit a contemporary garden. The copper-covered roof and copper base add a bit of sparkle to this clean white house. Wood/Copper Birdhouse, $34 from Gardener’s Eden (866-430-3336; www.gardenerseden.com).

NEXT-DOOR NESTERS

Double your birdwatching fun with a double-occupancy house. Handmade of aged Pennsylvania barn siding by craftsman Eric Berman, this sturdy house can accommodate two active families. Birds of a Feather, $110 by Erickson Birdhouses (800-382-2473; www.bird-houses.com).

A GOURD HOME

Hollowed gourds attract cavity-nesters, and complement a naturalistic garden. The crafters at Maine’s Little River Flower Farm cull from the four acres of gourds grown there each year to fashion houses in a wide range of shapes, sizes, and decorative finishes. Star and Raffia Gooseneck, $32.50 by Little River Flower Farm (207-929-3967; www.littleriverflowerfarm.com).

CURVE APPEAL

Attention to detail attracts birds and birders alike. A curved, asymmetrical shape puts a new spin on a familiar style, while slatted construction improves ventilation and drainage, and the lack of a perch discourages predators. Nature’s Niche Bird’s Eye View, $32.99 from Birdsperch (800-748-6487; www.birdsperch.com).

WHERE THE ART IS

Just as a garden can be a unique work of art, so can a birdhouse. Artist Michael Parayano crafts one-of-a kind homes using scrap wood, salvaged materials, and natural driftwood, and ages each for an ultra-rustic look. Laura, $149.95 by Berkeley Rustic Birdhouses (510-827-5414; www.berkeleyrusticbirdhouses.com).

AU THATCHURAL

Nuthatches and titmice are ceratinly cute—and so are the raffia-thatched pockets built with them and similar little birds in mind. Thatched Roof Nesting Pockets, set of two $9.95 from Duncraft (800-593-5656; www.duncraft.com).

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