An Architect’s Eye

FROM A LIFETIME OF CREATIVE WORK, MARY DAVIS HAS FASHIONED A WHOLLY ORIGINAL AESTHETIC

TEXT AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHARLES MANN

THE STRUCTURE OF A SQUID’S EYE bears an eerie similarity to that of human, despite having developed in an unrelated organism. The rise of similar forms from separate origins is a phenomenon known as convergent evolution. Like the torpedo shapes of porpoises, sharks, and penguins, the end products are similar in appearance, but the results of unrelated starting points.

Mary Davis’s garden is a case in point. Built along a quiet cove on the coast of Washington State, a decidedly Japanese flavor seems evident in the large islands of smooth granite river rock and sweeping carpets of mossy groundcovers punctuated by round stepping stones and curving paths. The overall tone is one of understatement, from the absence of blooming perennials to the Dali-esque sprinkling of pruned apple trees and Japanese maples. In fact, everything about it shouts

Related Posts:

  • No Related Posts

Leave a Reply